Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems

Federal personnel are required to:

  • Demonstrate ability to collect Operating Data on system:
  • Read required pressures, temperatures, control panels and other operating parameters (e.g., Using gauges, meters and computer systems)
  • Check oil levels and other required levels
  • Log equipment reading and report any inconsistencies
  • Demonstrate ability to adjust System Parameters as required.
  • Demonstrate understanding of indoor air quality – how to test and adjust. (e.g., Air pollutant sources, biological contaminants, air sampling, CO2 measurement, mold, control strategies, system balancing, ventilation).
  • Demonstrate ability to analyze HVAC system performance (e.g., chillers, boilers, ventilation, pressure, temperature, amperage, voltage, air flow, water flow):
  • Collect trends of operational parameters
  • Conduct performance tests and collect data
  • Compare trends and data
  • Report findings
  • Demonstrate ability to coordinate HVAC system changes.
  • Demonstrate knowledge and ability to maintain all HVAC Systems (e.g., clean, change and perform preventative maintenance).
  • Demonstrate knowledge and ability to repair all HVAC Systems (e.g., calibrate, change, fabricate, recover, replace and troubleshoot):
  • Ability to perform advanced troubleshooting techniques using appropriate tools
  • Demonstrate knowledge and ability to optimize HVAC controls (e.g., calibrated energy savings, reduced ventilation where possible, hot/cold water resets, economizer control, start/stop timers, demand load shedding).

Related Courses

Title Description Organizations Competencies
Steam Systems II: Impact of Boiler Sizing, Pressure, and Velocity

Steam has come a long way from its traditional associations with locomotives and the Industrial Revolution. Today, it serves as an integral and essential part of modern technology. This course will introduce a measure of boiler efficiency and discuss the impact of correct boiler sizing as well as how working pressure affects efficiency. We will also look at choosing the correct steam velocity for a given system. Finally, we will talk about how air and non-condensable gases can impact a steam system.

The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

This course is accredited by: IEEE, USGBC, BPI, BOMI, CIBSE, ACORE, REEP, FIRE, AFE, CPD, IAAT, and FENITEL

Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems
Steam Systems III: Distribution, Control & Regulation of Steam

Steam is one of the oldest and most widely used forms of energy in industry. Difficulties in energy management of steam arise from the fact that it is often a totally unmeasured service. The distribution, control and regulation of steam is crucial because inefficiency translates into additional operating costs. The savings potential is enormous: Not only from a fiscal standpoint, but also from an environmental standpoint. This course will review the basics of steam systems and list the benefits associated with measuring steam. We will discuss steam piping design, metering, and steam manifolds. Also addressed are two typical applications of tracing as well as the components involved when controlling and regulating steam.

The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

This course is accredited by: IEEE, USGBC, BPI, BOMI, CIBSE, ACORE, REEP, FIRE, AFE, CPD, IAAT, and FENITEL

Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems
Steam Systems IV: Condensate Removal—Prevent your energy from going down the drain

In the previous courses, we saw that steam condenses in the distribution pipes, and has to be removed to avoid water hammer. The financial value of condensate has been neglected in the past, but has a distinct monetary value which must be recaptured. This course will explore why it is far too valuable to merely discard condensate to the ground or a drain. It will help you to calculate the value of the condensate, and explain the different types of steam traps available for separating.

The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

This course is accredited by: IEEE, USGBC, BOMI, CIBSE, ACORE, REEP, FIRE, AFE, CPD, IAAT, and FENITEL

Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems
Steam Systems V: Condensate Removal – Maximizing Your Recovery

In Steam Systems part one, we discussed the overall advantages and basics of steam as source of energy. In part two, we looked at the impact of boiler sizing, pressure and velocity on overall system efficiency. During part three, we reviewed the distribution, control and regulation of steam, and in part four we learned how to prevent energy from going down the drain by implementing proper condensate removal strategies. Now we will further explore condensate removal and show you how to maximize your recovery with considerations for choosing traps, proper testing and sizing of traps and options for how to lift the condensate. To ensure your steam system enjoys a long and full life cycle, we’ll summarize a preventative maintenance program. The downfalls of by-passes, and impact of waterlogging will also be discussed.

The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

This course is accredited by: IEEE, USGBC, BOMI, CIBSE, ACORE, REEP, FIRE, AFE, CPD, IAAT, and FENITEL

Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems
Steam Systems VI: Recovering Energy from Flash Steam

In this series of courses on steam systems we have reviewed a number of key success factors for efficient operation of steam systems, including correct boiler sizing, selection of working pressure and pipe sizing, metering of steam, and removal of condensate. Flash steam is another essential topic for the efficient management of steam. This course will discuss how flash steam recovery contributes to energy efficiency, how to identify how much flash steam is available and discuss ways to recover that steam.

The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

This course is accredited by: IEEE, USGBC, BPI, BOMI, CIBSE, ACORE, REEP, FIRE, AFE, CPD, IAAT, and FENITEL

Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems
Thermal Energy Storage

Storing thermal energy can save money in a number of different ways. High-cost peak-time power usage is avoided. Also, with stored cooling capacity, the cooling system doesn’t have to cope with the hottest part of the day in real-time. It may be possible to install a smaller compressor, pumps and pipes. This may help reduce the initial purchase cost and operating and maintenance costs.

Some very broad conditions favor thermal energy storage, but it’s not advisable without competent staff to oversee operation.

This course offers a description of the various forms thermal energy storage, describes strategies, provides advantages and drawbacks and provides realistic examples and calculations in US Customary and Metric units. The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

This course is accredited by: IEEE, USGBC, BPI, BOMI, CIBSE, ACORE, REEP, FIRE, AFE, CPD, IAAT, and FENITEL

Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems
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