Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems

Federal personnel are required to:

  • Demonstrate ability to collect Operating Data on system:
  • Read required pressures, temperatures, control panels and other operating parameters (e.g., Using gauges, meters and computer systems)
  • Check oil levels and other required levels
  • Log equipment reading and report any inconsistencies
  • Demonstrate ability to adjust System Parameters as required.
  • Demonstrate understanding of indoor air quality – how to test and adjust. (e.g., Air pollutant sources, biological contaminants, air sampling, CO2 measurement, mold, control strategies, system balancing, ventilation).
  • Demonstrate ability to analyze HVAC system performance (e.g., chillers, boilers, ventilation, pressure, temperature, amperage, voltage, air flow, water flow):
  • Collect trends of operational parameters
  • Conduct performance tests and collect data
  • Compare trends and data
  • Report findings
  • Demonstrate ability to coordinate HVAC system changes.
  • Demonstrate knowledge and ability to maintain all HVAC Systems (e.g., clean, change and perform preventative maintenance).
  • Demonstrate knowledge and ability to repair all HVAC Systems (e.g., calibrate, change, fabricate, recover, replace and troubleshoot):
  • Ability to perform advanced troubleshooting techniques using appropriate tools
  • Demonstrate knowledge and ability to optimize HVAC controls (e.g., calibrated energy savings, reduced ventilation where possible, hot/cold water resets, economizer control, start/stop timers, demand load shedding).

Related Courses

Title Description Organizations Competencies
Fan Systems IV: Improving System Efficiency

Problems such as unusually high operating and maintenance costs, poor airflow delivery, surges or noise or wear on the electrical components can be caused by oversized fans, poor system design, poor balancing or leakage, or wasteful airflow control practices. Often, users are only concerned with initial cost, accepting the lowest bid for a component, while ignoring system efficiency. To achieve optimum fan system economics, users should select equipment based on life-cycle economics and operate and maintain the equipment for peak performance. This course helps define opportunities to improve fan system performance by identifying common fan problems. We’ll also uncover why a highly efficient fan system is not merely a system with an energy-efficient motor.

The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

This course is accredited by: USGBC, BOMI, CIBSE, ACORE, REEP, FIRE, AFE, CPD, IAAT, and FENITEL

Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems
HVAC and Characteristics of Air (U.S. Version)

HVAC & Characteristics of Air introduces some basic HVAC terms that are useful when looking at the efficiency of an HVAC system. This course discusses how an HVAC system manipulates the properties of the air in the conditioned space to regulate a desirable rate of heat transfer. Calculations for Sensible Heat Transfer and Total Heat Transfer are also explained.

The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

This course is accredited by: IEEE, USGBC, AHLEI, BPI, BOMI, CIBSE, ACORE, REEP, FIRE, AFE, CPD, IAAT, and FENITEL

Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems
HVAC and Psychrometric Charts (U.S. Version)

Psychrometrics is the study of the thermodynamic properties of moist air and its effect on materials and human comfort. Psychrometrics applies the well understood relationships between humidity and temperature in the air to practical problems.

HVAC system designers use these factors to model the HVAC requirements depending on the location of the building and the needs of the occupants or processes within it. This course explores how those factors are used to ensure an effective HVAC system, while discussing how Psychrometric Charts are utilized to drive HVAC sizing and evaluation.

The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems
HVAC Efficiency and Equipment Optimization (U.S. Version)

HVAC is often a major component of the energy costs in a building. The efficiency of HVAC is dependent on both the efficiency of the equipment and the efficiency of the system – how it is designed and operated. Choosing the lowest cost system will often be a mistake when lifecycle costs are taken into account. However even high-efficiency equipment can underperform if not operated optimally. This course looks at a variety of key success factors to optimize the efficiency of an HVAC system. It also explains how the efficiency of HVAC units is measured, and how the overall capacity of a system can be expressed.

The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems
HVAC Geothermal Heat Pumps

Geothermal heat pumps are fast becoming the leading technology for heating and cooling in energy efficient buildings. When using a geothermal heat pump for heating efficiencies are 50% to 70% higher than other heating systems and cooling efficiencies are 20% to 40% higher than conventional air conditioners. Better yet, these savings do not require complicated or difficult to operate systems. Geothermal heat pumps rely on off-the-shelf components that are familiar in conventional air conditioning. The underground components typically have a 50 year warranty (Source: International Ground Source Heat Pump Association).

In this course, we will explore all aspects of the geothermal heat pump, including the various installation types, and discuss the benefits and drawbacks of each type.
The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

This course is accredited by: USGBC, BOMI, CIBSE, ACORE, REEP, FIRE, AFE, CPD, IAAT, and FENITEL

Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems
HVAC Systems I: Introduction to HVAC Systems

Heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems are critical in maintaining a comfortable and productive environment. The first course in a series of three, this course will review the processes in HVAC and examine a simple type of an all air-system.

The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems
HVAC Systems II: All-Air Systems and Temperature Control

Heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems are essential to maintain a comfortable and productive environment. The second course in a series of three, this course will explain the impact of constant volume, variable air volume and reheat in an all-air system, including dual-duct and multizone all-air systems.

The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems
HVAC Systems III: Air-and-Water and All-Water Systems

Air-and-water systems are used primarily for perimeter building spaces with high sensible loads. All-water systems use water as the medium for providing heating and cooling throughout a building. The third course in a series of three, this course will explain the functions of air-and-water systems as well as an all-water system.

The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems
HVAC Thermodynamic States

All refrigeration systems involve the movement or transport of heat from a cold region to a warm region. The subject of thermodynamics describes how these heat transports may occur.

Thermodynamics is a branch of physical science that deals with the relations between heat and other forms of energy (such as mechanical, electrical, or chemical energy), and, by extension, of the relationships and interconvertibility of all forms of energy. “Thermo” means heat, and “dynamic” refers to energy and change.

In cooling applications, we are interested in managing heat, energy, and change, and so a knowledge of basic thermodynamics helps us to grasp the processes that are taking place, for example, in an air-conditioner.

The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

This course is accredited by: USGBC, BOMI, CIBSE, ACORE, REEP, FIRE, AFE, CPD, IAAT, and FENITEL

Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems
Steam Systems I: Advantages and Basics of Steam

Steam has come a long way from its traditional associations with locomotives and the Industrial Revolution. Today, it serves as an integral and essential part of modern technology. This course will introduce the benefits of utilizing steam in numerous processes and discuss t selecting the appropriate pressures for each of these different processes.

The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

This course is accredited by: IEEE, USGBC, BOMI, CIBSE, ACORE, REEP, FIRE, AFE, CPD, IAAT, and FENITEL

Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems
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