Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems

Federal personnel are required to:

  • Demonstrate ability to collect Operating Data on system:
  • Read required pressures, temperatures, control panels and other operating parameters (e.g., Using gauges, meters and computer systems)
  • Check oil levels and other required levels
  • Log equipment reading and report any inconsistencies
  • Demonstrate ability to adjust System Parameters as required.
  • Demonstrate understanding of indoor air quality – how to test and adjust. (e.g., Air pollutant sources, biological contaminants, air sampling, CO2 measurement, mold, control strategies, system balancing, ventilation).
  • Demonstrate ability to analyze HVAC system performance (e.g., chillers, boilers, ventilation, pressure, temperature, amperage, voltage, air flow, water flow):
  • Collect trends of operational parameters
  • Conduct performance tests and collect data
  • Compare trends and data
  • Report findings
  • Demonstrate ability to coordinate HVAC system changes.
  • Demonstrate knowledge and ability to maintain all HVAC Systems (e.g., clean, change and perform preventative maintenance).
  • Demonstrate knowledge and ability to repair all HVAC Systems (e.g., calibrate, change, fabricate, recover, replace and troubleshoot):
  • Ability to perform advanced troubleshooting techniques using appropriate tools
  • Demonstrate knowledge and ability to optimize HVAC controls (e.g., calibrated energy savings, reduced ventilation where possible, hot/cold water resets, economizer control, start/stop timers, demand load shedding).

Related Courses

Title Description Organizations Competencies
Compressed Air Systems II: Compressor Types

Compressed air is one of the most expensive utilities. There are many different types and designs of air compressors. Each is suited for different applications in buildings and industry. In this course, we will explore the main types of compressors and identify their differences, compare the capacity and efficiency of different types of compressors and we will identify appropriate compressor types for an application.

This is the second in a series of compressed air system courses offered by Energy University. If you have not already done so, it is recommended that you participate in Compressed Air Systems I: An Introduction before taking this course.

The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

This course is accredited by: USGBC, BOMI, CIBSE, ACORE, REEP, FIRE, AFE, CPD, IAAT, and FENITEL

Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems
Compressed Air Systems III: Controlled Methods

Compressed air is an extremely expensive utility. Therefore, efficient control methods can have a big impact on the energy costs of the system. The purpose of this course is to identify the various methods to control air compressor capacity, including methods that control the flow of air into the compressor and ways of controlling the loading of the compressor itself.

The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

This course is accredited by: USGBC, BOMI, CIBSE, ACORE, REEP, FIRE, AFE, CPD, IAAT, and FENITEL

Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems
Compressed Air Systems IV: Supply Side Components

Compressed air system components can usually identified by major function that they provide whether the function is related to compression, conditioning, filtration, distribution, and some nature of end use. Most systems have a supply-side and a demand-side. This course will explore the supply-side, which is normally where ambient air is processed into a pressurized, dry, clean form that can be used for many useful tasks.

The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems
Compressed Air V: Efficient Management & Utilization

In this class, the demand side of the compressed air system is explored. The demand side includes components after the primary receiver, and the pressure / flow controller including the distribution and storage components, and end use equipment. A properly managed demand-side minimizes wasted air and uses compressed air for appropriate applications. This course addresses how to deal with the inefficiencies that can be present in the demand side of the system, thereby leading to energy and cost savings.

The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems
Compressed Air VI: Seven Steps to Better Efficiency

Compressed air is commonly referred to as the fourth utility. Utilities play a major role in the modern world – without them, today’s technologically advanced society could not function. While compressed air systems are widespread, they can also be extremely inefficient. Compressed air systems typically consume more energy and cost more to operate than anything else in industrial environments. All of that can change by utilizing an action plan that will help reduce inefficiencies, thereby saving valuable assets.

In this class, we will explore a seven step action plan designed to improve the efficiency of any compressed air system.
This course was produced with the help of the Compressed Air Challenge.

The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems
Energy Efficiency with Building Automation Systems I

In this course we will focus on what a building automation system (BAS) is as well as some of the commonly used terminology. We will also look at some of the HVAC strategies used in building automation systems.

The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

This course is accredited by: IEEE, USGBC, AHLEI, BPI, BOMI, CIBSE, ACORE, REEP, FIRE, AFE, CPD, IAAT, and FENITEL

Building Automation Systems, Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems, Technology
Energy Efficiency with Building Automation Systems II

In this course, we will focus on the energy conservation measures that can be used with building automation systems.

The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

This course is accredited by: IEEE, USGBC, AHLEI, BPI, BOMI, CIBSE, ACORE, REEP, FIRE, AFE, CPD, IAAT, and FENITEL

Building Automation Systems, Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems, Technology
Fan Systems I: Introduction to Fan Performance

Fans are machines for moving air and air-borne materials, and are widely used in industrial and commercial applications. Fans use billions of kilowatt-hours of energy each year. Fan reliability can be critical – for example, in material handling operations fan failure will often force a process stoppage. The importance of reliability may cause system designers to compensate for uncertainties by adding capacity to fans. Unfortunately, fans that are oversized for their service requirements do not operate at their best efficiency points. Paradoxically oversizing fan systems creates problems that can increase system operating costs while decreasing fan reliability.

In this class we provide a basic introduction to fans to equip an energy manager to understand the principal characteristics of this equipment.

The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems
Fan Systems II: Fan Types

Key impacts that determine which fan type is the most appropriate include technical and nontechnical attributes. Understanding the principles of fan selection can be helpful in correcting poor system performance, especially during retrofit or upgrade opportunities. In this course we will look at the different fan types and the appropriate applications for each fan type.

The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

This course is accredited by: USGBC, BOMI, CIBSE, ACORE, REEP, FIRE, AFE, CPD, IAAT, and FENITEL

Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems
Fan Systems III: Improving System Efficiency

Fan systems are vital to the operation of many industries and buildings. Fans often serve over a wide range of operating conditions because of changes in ambient conditions, occupancy, and production demands. The importance of fans often causes system designers to be concerned about under-performing systems. Designers tend to compensate for uncertainties by adding capacity. However, peak requirements may only occur for a few days or weeks each year, and normal operating conditions could be well below the design conditions. Although your fan may be the right size some of the time, it may be the wrong size most of the time. An oversized fan operates below its most efficient point and creates problems such as high capital costs, high energy costs, decreased reliability, high system pressures and flow noise. In this course we will discuss the ways that airflow is controlled in fan systems and we will define the main opportunities to improve performance in fan systems. We will also explore common fan system problems.

The course link will take you to the Energy University landing page; if this is your first Energy University course, click “Join” and complete the form. Returning students can “Login” from the landing page. You can search for each course by title.

This course is accredited by: USGBC, BOMI, CIBSE, ACORE, REEP, FIRE, AFE, CPD, IAAT, and FENITEL

Building Systems, Facilities Operations and Management, Facilities Operations, Maintenance and Engineering, Operating and Maintaining Electrical and Mechanical Systems, Operating and Maintaining HVAC Systems
1 2 3 4